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Hawthorne Hill
https://www.facebook.com/daytonhistory

If you want to take a ride in an electric vehicle and chat with enthusiastic and knowledgeable owners, then go to Sinclair College Automotive Center on Edwin C. Moses Boulevard and take a ride.  You learn about very low energy and maintenance costs and, of course, no fossil burning pollution emissions. This is Saturday, noon to 5pm. On your Facebook go to DriveElectricDayton

honeybee on flower
kuhnmi / Flickr Creative Commons

A season is always the sum of its parts. The pieces of Early Spring are few and subtle, but Middle Spring, reaching its zenith this week, leaves little to the imagination. The meager inventories of change that characterized equinox quickly fill with new details. Trees leaf and flowers bloom, unmistakable, their numbers catching the eye of almost everyone.

Fiver Rivers Metro Park bike trail
https://www.facebook.com/fiveriversmetroparks

The MeowZa Grand Re-Opening! You've cat to be kitten us! We are so excited right meow!! It’s inside the Dayton Mall to celebrate the new, larger location in the JCPenney Courtyard with some fantastic feline fun including cupcakes, a raffle for a new 6-foot-tall cat tree, special adoption pricing for all cats and kittens and more. This is today through Sunday.

ant on flower
vivek raj / Flickr Creative Commons

According to some recent studies, an insect Armageddon is taking place throughout the United States and Europe. Some scientists project that over half of all insect species could disappear by the end of the 21st century.

The insect population around my yard has diminished markedly in just two years. I used to be able to find angleworms under the mulch near my sidewalk. Last year, no worms. Ants used to build entrances to their nests in the cracks of the sidewalk. No more ants.  Scorpion flies, aphids and beeflies were once plentiful in my garden, but no longer.

Art-Pop psychedelic duo Princess will perform at The Contemporary Dayton on Saturday.
courtesy of The Contemporary Dayton

The Yellow Cab Tavern is hosting 26 local crafters and artisans to sell their creations and demonstrate their craft at the 8th annual Dayton Crafty-Con. Dayton’s favorite craft convention is bringing the joy of crafting and admission to the event and it is free and open to the public. This is tonight from 5 to 10pm.

cows and horses in pasture
Till Westermayer / Flickr Creative Commons

Back in 2005, my friend Ruby (who was 95 at the time), had seen cows standing knee deep in mud, and she saw one of them switch its tail, and that, she declared, was a sign of spring.

Indeed, under the Cows Switching Their Tails Moon, the signs are all about. Toads and green frogs sing, ducklings and goslings hatch. Flowering pears and plums and apples and cherries bloom and set their fruit.

Dayton Masonic Center
https://www.facebook.com/DaytonMasonicLive/

What does it mean to be American today? That’s a question at the heart of American Creed, a documentary film followed with a Community Conversation facilitated by Miami University history professor Steven Conn. This is at the  Wright Memorial Public Library in Oakwood on Saturday, 1 to 3:30pm.

The Jersey Seasons and Beach Party Boys. Two fabulous shows in one night at the Dayton Masonic Center on Saturday, 7pm.

Forsythia
slgckgc / Flickr Creative Commons

No matter the weather, April almost always means middle spring right around the corner, and, especially if the early spring has been cold, it could be a good time to count the weeks until summer.

DCDC2 & the University of Dayton Dance Ensemble are doing "Balance." This collaboration showcases some of the finest up-and-coming young dancers. This is at the University of Dayton, Kennedy Union Boll Theatre on Saturday at 8pm and Sunday at 1pm.

Lukasz Rawa / Flickr Creative Commons

Often, the landscape still seems to lie in winter even when the sun says spring. But the season takes on its character from many cues and signs, or what anthropologist Keith Basso calls “mnemonic pegs.” A person might use such pegs, formed by objects or events, like blooming daffodils or singing birds, to formulate what anthropologists call a “topogeny,” a listing of phenomena that creates maps or paths.

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