WYSO

Clayton Luckie

(from left) FBI special agent Joseph Deters, U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Former Dayton City Commissioner Joey Williams has been convicted in connection with an ongoing federal corruption probe. He pleaded guilty Friday to bribery charges in United States District Court.

Williams was indicted earlier this year for accepting a construction project at his home in exchange for influence over the awarding of city contracts.  

He’s expected to be sentenced January 29.

(from left) FBI special agent Joseph Deters, U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

One of four men indicted on federal corruption charges has pled guilty. Former State Rep. Clayton Luckie entered his guilty plea to a single count of mail fraud, though his indictment under an ongoing Department of Justice investigation into alleged public corruption in the city of Dayton also included a felony count of wire fraud.

Dayton City Commissioners Wednesday voted to approve an ordinance banning panhandling along several busy roadways within city limits
April Laissle / WYSO

Voters across the Dayton region cast ballots in Tuesday’s primary elections. In the competitive race for Dayton City Commission, five candidates were vying to compete for two open seats in the fall. Now, four candidates move on to a place on the November ballot.

Montgomery County Board of Election unofficial results show voters approved incumbent City Commissioners Matt Joseph, with more than 28 percent of the vote, and Chris Shaw, with more than 25 percent of the vote, to compete in November.

The city of Dayton’s Human Relations Council announced Tuesday it has hired Trotwood management consultant Adrienne Heard.

According to a press release from the city, Heard will join the Greater Dayton Minority Business Assistance Center to ensure it remains fully operational.

A city spokesperson says Heard will serve as a consultant, "joining staff to handle services until further notice."

Last week, the center’s director RoShawn Winburn was indicted under federal charges of alleged fraud and public corruption. Winburn remains on administrative leave.

open sign
Deb Beatty Mel / Flickr Creative Commons

Dayton officials say the city’s Minority Business Assistance Center remains open for business. Center director RoShawn Winburn is on leave and faces wire fraud and public corruption charges stemming from a federal investigation revealed last week by the Department of Justice.

He’s accused of taking thousands of dollars in bribes and providing confidential information to companies seeking city contracts.

WYSO/Joshua Chenault

On Tuesday, four Dayton men, including former city commissioner Joey Williams and current city official Roshawn Winburn, were indicted on a range of charges including bribery, wire fraud, and public corruption. Former state representative Clayton Luckie, and entrepreneur Brian Higgins were also indicted. 

The allegations come ahead of  the May 7 primary election where five candidates are running for two open seats on the city commission.

April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton Commission held its first meeting Wednesday, one day after federal law enforcement officials revealed a major investigation into alleged fraud and public corruption in the city’s government. The probe is related to the city’s handling of public contracts.

At the commission meeting, Dayton officials announced they’re launching their own separate internal investigation into the federal allegations. 

(from left) FBI special agent Joseph Deters, U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Former longtime Dayton City Commissioner Joey Williams is among a handful of public officials and business owners now facing federal fraud charges.  The Department of Justice said Tuesday the charges are the result of a sweeping investigation into alleged public corruption in the city of Dayton. 

A former four-term Ohio state representative has reported to prison to begin serving a sentence for falsifying campaign reports and misspending.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that 49-year-old Clayton Luckie of Dayton turned himself into the Franklin County jail in Columbus on Monday to await transfer to the state prison system.

Luckie was sentenced to three years in prison in January after pleading guilty to election falsification, grand theft and other charges.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

For the second time in a year, a former state representative is headed to prison for ethics problems while he was in office.

Former state Rep. Clayton Luckie pleaded guilty to eight charges out of 50 and got a three year prison sentence for skimming as much as 150-thousand dollars out of his campaign fund over a six year period. Luckie told the court he wanted to apologize to his constituents, his family and his colleagues at the Statehouse for what he called his errors in judgment.