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Children

There are about 133,000 children in Ohio that do not have health care insurance, according to a report from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families.

DeWine at a pediatric mental health conference in Dayton.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine says he expects to share the language of a gun-reform package with state lawmakers within days. The proposal would include measures the governor first discussed in the wake of the August 4 mass shooting in Dayton. 

In the wake of a widespread water outage in parts of Montgomery County, where millions of gallons of water leaked from a broken main under the Great Miami River overnight, Dayton Children’s Hospital is urging parents of young children to use health and safety precautions.

Thomas Krzmarzick is Dayton Children’s Division Chief of Emergency Medicine.

He says parents should follow county boil advisories because prevention is better than finding out you’ve ingested contaminated water.

Jenny Holmstrom

It’s a quiet summer evening outside the Xenia home of Michael and Lisa Anderson. But inside, it’s a world of women and small children. This is Lisa Anderson’s world. As a certified doula for the last two years, she provides support services for women and their newborns at home or in the hospital delivery room.

On the carpeted floor in the Andersons' living room, three infants play with brightly colored toys. Their tiny hands and fingers push and slap at the noise-making buttons, dials and knobs. Perhaps the quietest member of the group is Buffy, the Anderson’s Cairn terrier.

Dayton Police say a woman told them she fatally shot her two children to save them from the world's evils.

Detective Rod Roberts wrote in court documents that police interviewed Claudena Helton after the May 18 shooting. Her 8-year-old daughter and 6-year-old son died Sunday.

Municipal Court Judge Christopher Roberts set bond Monday at $1 million for Helton and scheduled a preliminary hearing for May 30. A public defender entered not-guilty pleas for Helton to charges of attempted murder and felonious assault.

A new state report shows an uptick in Ohio's infant mortality rate, with black babies dying at a rate approaching three times that of whites.

Data released Wednesday by the Ohio Department of Health shows the state's overall infant mortality rate increased to 7.2 deaths per 1,000 births last year. That's up from a rate of 6.8 deaths in 2014. The three leading causes continued to be prematurity, sleep-related deaths and birth defects.

Ohio had 1,005 infants die before their first birthdays in 2015, compared with 955 in 2014.

4 Paws for Ability
Jerry Kenney

4 Paws For Ability provides highly trained service dogs to children and veterans with disabilities.  They’ve been providing them since 1998—the organization began in Cincinnati but is now located in Xenia.

Kelly Camm is the development director of the organization. In this interview, with WYSO's Jerry Kenney, she explains how 4 Paws is unique because they don't operate under any age or geographic restrictions.

SCA Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget / Flickr

For the first time in years, Ohio has fallen behind most of the country when it comes to comes to caring for its kids. That’s according to annual Kids Count Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

“Syria In Our Eyes” Brings Syrian Youth Perspective To Dayton

Mar 25, 2016

A 2014 UNICEF report calls Syria one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a child. Since the start of the war in Syria in 2011, thousands of children have lost their families and friends and witnessed violence and brutality. One Syrian American family in the Dayton area has responded to the violence by organizing an exhibit of art by Syrian children. Syria in Our Eyes is on display at K12 and TEJAS Gallery in Dayton.

The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
Wikimedia

An Ohio initiative is seeking to boost access mental health consultants in an effort to curb the number of children expelled or suspended from kindergarten, preschool and other early childhood education settings.

The state's Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services says 75 counties are expected to benefit from $9.1 million set aside in the state's two-year budget to help fund the initiative. Up to 64 mental health consultants will work with teachers and at-risk students in early learning programs such as Head Start and preschool.

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