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Attorney General Mike DeWine

Richard Cordray and Mike DeWine tussled over healthcare, drug sentencing laws and support for local government in their third gubernatorial debate Monday night. 

DeWine, Ohio’s Republican attorney general, criticized Cordray for supporting Issue 1, which would reduce penalties for drug possession. Cordray, the Democratic former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau director, assailed DeWine for suing to block the Affordable Care Act. 

The latest fundraising numbers show this year’s race for Governor is going to be the most expensive in the state’s history.

The most recent fundraising filing with the Secretary of State shows Republican Mike DeWine has raised a total of more than $24 million while Democrat Richard Cordray has nearly $14 million in his campaign war chest. That’s more than $38 million combined, and it’s $8 million more than was raised in 2010 when Republican John Kasich beat incumbent Democrat Ted Strickland.

Republican Mike Dewine and Democrat Richard Cordray
via twitter

The Republican and Democratic candidates for governor met for their second face-to-face debate, this time taking questions from an audience and via social media at Marietta College.

The University of Dayton will host the first gubernatorial debate between Democrat Richard Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine.

"The University is honored to be selected to provide a venue for civil discourse about issues facing our state and excited about the opportunity to showcase the University of Dayton statewide," University of Dayton President Eric F. Spina said in a written statement.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO / WYSO

For the first time, the Republican candidate for governor is stating clearly that he would keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. Mike DeWine says he’s been supportive all along, but his opponent says that’s not true.

While accepting the endorsement of the Ohio State Medical Association, DeWine said he’d keep Medicaid expansion but that he’d reform it, including adding work requirements and wellness incentive programs.

“Look, there’s no change. What we have said is, all along, is that it had to be reformed,” DeWine said.

Joe Mullins and the Radio Ramblers perform at the DeWine Ice Cream Social.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Ice cream socials have been a summer staple for community gatherings and fundraisers since the invention of the creamy confection.  The first ice cream social documented in North America was in 1744 at a dinner party by Maryland Governor, Thomas Bladen. In 1802, Thomas Jefferson hosted the first Ice Cream Social in the White House.

Today on County Lines, Producer Renee Wilde goes to Cedarville, Ohio, Home of Attorney General Mike DeWine, to serve up a slice of rural Americana, a la mode.

Republican Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, one of the state's best-known politicians, and Democrat Richard Cordray, who headed a federal consumer protection agency in the Obama administration, are headed into their third career match-up this fall after a raucous roller-coaster of a primary season left them damaged as they seek to replace Republican Gov. John Kasich.

November's general election will feature two moderates who fought off challenges from the Republican right and the Democratic left.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio attorney general's office says investigations of human trafficking cases rose last year to its highest level since the state began keeping track of those numbers.

 The Blade reports authorities investigated 202 human trafficking cases in 2017, a 50 percent increase from the previous year. The report released last week by the state attorney general's Human Trafficking Commission shows the majority of cases involved the sex trade.

Statehouse News Bureau

State Auditor Dave Yost says questions about past drug convictions of a consultant who played a key role in Ohio’s new medical marijuana program, set to begin operation in September, need to be addressed now. He says it’s time for an investigation.

Yost says he’s troubled by reports that the consultant who graded applications from companies seeking licenses had drug convictions in his past.

“This is an epic fail. I’m outraged,” he said.

Yost questions how someone with those convictions could be hired by the state for $150,000 to do that work.

Jerry Kenney

Ohio officials recently announced a plan aimed at making it easier to become a foster parent. There’s a growing shortage of placements as a result of the worsening opioid epidemic. The addiction crisis is also making it more difficult to place children removed from an unstable home with family members, advocates say.

 

As of August, more than 15,000 children were reported in foster care in Ohio, but the state has just 7,200 foster families ready to take them.

 

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