WYSO

Advocates for Basic Legal Equality

A regularly scheduled Oakwood meeting drew a crowd eager to hear the city respond to allegations of biased policing.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Oakwood city officials are promising to review police policies and continue a program in anti-bias training for officers.

At an Oakwood City Council meeting Monday night, officials addressed a report released this fall by the nonprofit Legal Aid firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, or ABLE, which found one-third of all Oakwood traffic tickets written in 2016 went to black drivers in a city with a black population of less than 1 percent.

Oakwood officials dispute the report’s methodology and say its data isn’t comprehensive or conclusive.

The Oakwood City Council heard residents' comments in response to recent allegations of racial bias in police traffic stops.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A regularly scheduled Oakwood City Council Monday night addressed a recent report alleging Oakwood Police pull over a disproportionate number of black drivers. The nonprofit legal-aid firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality report also raises concerns about police officers running license plate checks on black drivers.

University of Dayton Criminal Justice Professor Martha Hurley, one of the report's authors, says it points to the possibility black drivers are being targeted.

police car with lights on
Scott Davidson / Flickr Creative Commons

Black drivers are pulled over in Oakwood more often than other drivers: this is one of the findings in a new report alleging the city also tickets black drivers more often than a neighboring community with a larger African-American population.

Legal Aid firm Advocates For Basic Legal Equality and University of Dayton Criminal Justice professor Martha Hurley, director of the criminal justice studies program, produced the report.

Demolition of Good Samaritan Hospital has begun with the facility's former Dayton Heart & Vascular Hospital at Good Samaritan, which was established in 2009.
Jerry Kenney

Members of the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition gathered with a handful of neighborhood residents outside the former Good Samaritan Hospital complex on Salem Avenue Tuesday morning. 

The assembly was a rallying cry, meant to urge former Good Sam patients to come forth with testimony that might be given to investigators from the United States Department of Health and Human Services civil rights division when they arrive in Dayton the week of May 6.

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Investigators from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services civil rights division are expected to visit Dayton soon. Health advocates say they’ll be in town the week of May 6 to gather testimony about community health impacts related to the  closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. 

Good Samaritan Hospital shut down last year and construction crews are already demolishing parts of the complex.

Dayton Springfield Cincinnati highway traffic interstate skyline roadways transportation car automobiles vehicles
Ohio Department of Transportation Facebook page

Legal advocates are offering a free workshop in Dayton Monday to assist people in applying to Ohio's new six-month driver’s license reinstatement program. Bureau of Motor Vehicles numbers show approximately 410,000 Ohioans across the state would be eligible.

The temporary Reinstatement Fee Amnesty Initiative was created by House Bill 336 and took effect in January. 

Dayton real-estate broker Veronica Bedell-Nevels.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A decade after the Great Recession and foreclosure crisis affected millions of Americans, homeownership remains a major way many people hope to build a nest egg and save for retirement.

But, new numbers from the National Association of Real Estate Brokers show the homeownership gap between whites and blacks is growing bigger. Whites are much more likely to own a home than African Americans in cities across the country.

April Laissle/WYSO

A West Dayton community group is expanding its federal civil rights complaint against Premier Health related to the company's recent closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. The organization alleges the health-care giant has engaged in a pattern of discrimination.

The Clergy Community Coalition originally filed a complaint against Premier Health with the United States Department of Health and Human Services back in May. The group argued Premier’s decision to close Good Sam would have a disproportionate impact on Dayton African-Americans.

The Dayton firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality has filed a class-action lawsuit against the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles
Flickr - brownpau, CC BY 2.0 / WYSO

Attorneys with the Dayton firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, or ABLE, are suing the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles for what they say is discrimination.

A new lawsuit alleges the state agency has unfairly denied United States citizens and legal-immigrant teenagers the right to their driver’s licenses or Ohio Identification cards.

The firm filed the class-action suit Tuesday in federal court, asking the court to consider changes to the state's policy covering minor driver's license and state ID applications.

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Crews are already in the process of removing medical equipment from Good Samaritan Hospital. The West Dayton facility shut its doors last week amid outcry and the opening of a federal civil rights investigation.

Now, Good Samaritan owner Premier Health is moving forward with plans to dismantle and demolish the complex over the next two years.  

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