WYSO

2019 Oregon District Shooting

April Laissle / WYSO

A friend of the gunman who killed nine people outside an Oregon District bar Sunday Aug. 4 now faces federal charges that could send him to prison for up to 15 years.

Authorities have charged 24-year-old Ethan Kollie with illegally owning firearms, and lying about his drug use on a federal form in order to acquire them.

Kollie allegedly told FBI agents he regularly smokes marijuana and used “hard drugs” with shooter Connor Betts in 2014 and 2015.

Jerry Kenney / WYSO

The Dayton Foundation says a fund set up to help victims of the mass shooting is on track to raise more than a million dollars. As of Monday afternoon, individuals had donated around $620,000 to the Dayton Oregon District Tragedy Fund. The foundation set up the fund early on August 4th - just hours after a gunman killed nine people and injured more than two dozen others.

Vice President of Development and Donor Services at the Dayton Foundation Michelle Lovely says corporations are also contributing in a big way.

Sign with the names of the nine victims of the August 4 mass shooting in front of Omega Music in the Oregon District
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Dayton religious leaders held services Sunday to memorialize the nine people killed in a mass shooting in the city one week ago. At one well-attended service just five miles west of the site of the shooting, the discussion turned political.

Waymen AME Chapel leaders encouraged the congregation to forgive the 24-year-old gunman, who was killed by police shortly after he opened fire. But Reverend Charles Holmes also urged action.

The Bridges family drove over an hour to place nine teddy bears on the memorial in the Oregon District, one for each of the victims who lost their lives.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

It’s been a week since a 24-year-old gunman shot and killed nine people in Dayton’s Oregon District, leaving more than two dozen other people injured.

And, the district was busy this weekend with crowds of people lining up to pay their respects at a makeshift memorial to the victims.

The sidewalk memorial of photos, flower bouquets, cards and candles outside the nightclub where the shooting happened grows bigger every day. Hanging above it is a graffiti mural reading “Dayton Strong” in red and blue bubble letters and hearts.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

 

In the early morning hours on August 4, 2019, a mass shooting in Dayton's Oregon Distrit took the lives of nine people and injured dozens of others. This edition of WYSO Weekend Today’s looks back at the long week since news of the shooting broke. Throughout the week that followed, WYSO reporters talked to some of people who make up a community that has been changed in some, perhaps undetermined, way. You'll hear from some those residents, and hear from those who believe the city of Dayton remains unchanged in the way that people come together in the face of tragedy.


Could it happen here? It's a question a lot of people ask in the wake of a traumatic event.

Even if you're not directly connected to the events in El Paso, Gilroy or Dayton, chances are you've felt the weight of them.

Oregon District residents and regulars gather at Lily's Bistro, just hours after the mass shooting, to raise money for a waitress who was shot and in emergency surgery. Outside, fire and police are still cleaning the streets.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Just hours after the mass shooting that killed nine and injured dozens more, Emily Mendenhall decided to throw a fundraiser. Not some time off in the future. But right then and there.

Mendenhall is from a restaurant family that owns multiple businesses on 5th Street, where the shooting occurred. She runs Lily’s Bistro. Her brother runs Blind Bob’s, and one of the waitresses who works at Blind Bob’s, Alayna Young, was shot.

Dion Green is a soft-spoken 37-year-old with short dreadlocks and a muscular build. He works at a men's homeless shelter helping the less fortunate.

In recent months, though, Green has been thrust onto the other side of crisis-solving. He has now found himself the one who is trying to traverse misery.

Karen Wonders was out of town last Sunday when she received a news alert on her phone of a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio. She operates the Maple Tree Cancer Alliance, which provides exercise training to cancer patients and is based there.

"Soon after that I got a phone call from one of our trainers," Wonders said. "And I knew when she was calling that something bad had happened."

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo.

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