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Poor Will's Almanack: October 11 - 17, 2016

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The Frog and Toad Migration Moon waxes until it becomes completely full  October 15. Rising in the evening and setting in the morning, the moon will be overhead around midnight.

Full moon should strengthen the traditional mid-October cold front, increasing the chances for frost and even snow fluries.

And this stage of the lunar orb may affect more than the weather.

According to lunar lore, full moon is likely to cause problems for healthcare workers – making patients more difficult to deal with, and problems for teachers – making students harder to handle. Children may cause more trouble at home. Lovers may quarrel more.

Tempers may be more prone to flare at football, soccer and Lacrosse games on Friday,  Saturday and Sunday.
And when the full moon occurs in the middle of leaf drop, like it does this year, the accompanying radical change in the appearance of the landscape can trigger strong mood swings. And, not too surprising, the full autumn moon is especially conducive to quitting work, elopement, proposals of marriage – and sudden divorce, so think before you act.

There’s more: Full moon has also been linked to a rise in blood pressure, an increase in the number of heart attacks, to more crime than usual.

On the other hand, it may bring on the most wildest, happiest, and most creative time of the month.

This is Bill Felker with Poor Will’s Almanack. I’ll be back again next week with notes for the fourth week of middle fall. In the meantime, just be careful. It’s full moon time, you know.

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Bill Felker has been writing nature columns and almanacs for regional and national publications since 1984. His Poor Will’s Almanack has appeared as an annual publication since 2003. His organization of weather patterns and phenology (what happens when in nature) offers a unique structure for understanding the repeating rhythms of the year.