WYSO

WYSO Weekend

Sunday, 10-10:30am

Welcome to WYSO Weekend where every Sunday morning, host Jerry Kenney brings you highlights from the week's news, issues, interviews, arts and cultural events from across the Miami Valley.  You'll also hear the latest stories from WYSO Community Voices producers, and features from Dayton Youth Radio, Senior Voices, County Lines and other series. 
 

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The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the cancellation of a lot of summer events in the Miami Valley - Fraze Pavilion concerts, local water parks, and several 4th of July fireworks shows, just to name a few. Other events around the state are sharing that fate. In early March, when Ohio had yet to see a confirmed case of COVID-19, officials decided to drastically pare back the Arnold Sports Festival, one of Columbus’s premier sports events. Now, through public records and interviews compiled for Ohio Public Radio, WOSU’s Nick Evans reconstructs how officials arrived at what they called a gut-wrenching decision.


WYSO Weekend Heid Rd.
Jerry Kenney

Social distancing is here for the foreseeable future. But for people who are blind, contact with others can be essential for many daily life tasks. Community Voices producer Susan Byrnes tells us how one person without sight is managing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gabriel and Sarah Bosslet are doctors who have been married almost 20 years. Sarah was diagnosed early this year with breast cancer. Soon, the world began dealing with another health crisis: the coronavirus pandemic. The Bosslets spoke with reporter Lauren Bavis about the hard choices they made to balance their essential work in health care and their family’s health and safety.  It’s part of the Essential Voices series from Side Effects Public Media.


Jerry Kenney

As Ohio rolls out plans to reopen its economy, the economic fallout continues. The state is struggling to process the record number of unemployment claims filed during the pandemic. Millions of Americans are still waiting for their federal stimulus checks -- like Dayton 28-year-old single mom Dejanee Coaston, who lives with her daughter on the Westside of Dayton. When the coronavirus shutdown took effect, she lost most of her hours at her restaurant job and quickly fell behind. After weeks of scrambling Coaston finally started a new job at a factory but the damage is already done. Her rent is late and her landlord’s threatening to evict the family from their rented home. Coaston tells WYSO the situation is all the more difficult because she only recently got back on her feet after last year’s tornado outbreak.     


Jerry Kenney

If you’re looking for something fun to do while staying at home, Miami Valley museums may have you covered. They’ve been beefing up their virtual products to keep patrons, both new and old, well cultured while quarantined. Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds has been on a lot of online tours lately. 


Jerry Kenney

Over the past few weeks, the COVID-19 crisis has completely upended life as we know it. Dayton Daily News investigative reporter Josh Sweigert has been reporting on how the pandemic is affecting the people and businesses here in the Miami Valley, and he joins us today to talk a little bit about what he's found.

When Ohio first ordered its bars to close, beer sales in grocery stores jumped 42% that week. But for small craft breweries, taprooms and restaurants, those sales are often the largest and most reliable revenue streams. That leaves a lot of locally owned breweries looking at a big net loss. WYSO’s Jason Reynolds reports.


Shoes 4 the Shoeless is a local nonprofit that’s usually out there making sure that kids who need shoes get a pair. But now that the  coronavirus has changed so many things, they turned their attention to making sure everyone in the community gets enough to eat.  WYSO’s Jason Reynolds has our story.


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Jerry Kenney / WYSO Public Radio

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Up front, just one of the pressing stories we’re following this week as the pandemic continues…. The coronavirus is putting additional stress on Ohio’s already strained foster care system. For Ohio Public Media, WCPN’s Taylor Haggerty says concerns about the virus have stalled licensing for potential foster parents…. Then, throughout this coronavirus crisis, officials have been repeating the same refrain over and over again. Stay at home: "Stay away from other people. Wash your hands, Don’t touch your face. Stop this virus’s spread." It turns out, this new normal comes from a very old playbook. WYSO’s Jason Saul has this story….


Jerry Kenney / WYSO Public Radio

Blowing in on a Sunday morning it’s another edition of WYSO’s weekly radio magazine. Here’s what you can find in today’s program:

This week we heard from the governor that the state is probably going to have to double its hospital capacity to meet the needs of coronavirus patients. WYSO’s Jason Saul has the story. Then, Elaine Zamonski tells us about her experience with the drive-through testing for COVID-19. Her doctor sent her for a test when her cough, sore-throat and respiratory symptoms failed to improve with antibiotics. Her results came back negative, but now, Zamonski’s in self-quarantine at home with her husband and children.

Jerry Kenney / WYSO Public Radio

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Thousands of Ohioans are being laid off as businesses have temporarily shut their doors due to efforts to prevent the spread COVID 19. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports on what the state is doing to help those workers and companies.  And Ohio Governor Mike DeWine authorized the Ohio National Guard to assist food banks dealing with staffing shortages due to the coronavirus this week. WYSO’s Leila Goldstein reports that story.


Jerry Kenney / WYSO Public Radio

In this edition WYSO Weekend:

Several large events that typically have a huge economic impact for the Miami Valley have been cancelled because of fears surrounding the spread of the coronavirus. The International Winter Guard Competition, the NCAA First Four Tournament and other cancelled events mean the loss of millions of dollars to local communities. To talk about the impact of all this, we spoke with Richard Stock - an economist and the director of the Business Research Group at the University of Dayton.

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