WYSO

Community Voices

red graduation caps
Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr Creative Commons

Miami Valley college students are returning to campus this fall, but for some area young people, going to college presents extra challenges because they are undocumented immigrants.

Three years ago WYSO met one such young person as part of our Graduating Latino series, a then-junior at Ponitz Career Technology Center that we called Javier who had hoped to attend college here in the Miami Valley. Today we catch up with Javier and his family. Community Voices producer Jonathan Platt visited with them and brings us this update.

Senior Voices: Bessie Simien

Aug 22, 2018
Bessie Simien
Senior Voices

When Hurricane Katrina slammed the Gulf Coast in 2005, over 800,000 people evacuated from the city, and Bessie Simien was one of them. This week on Senior Voices, we hear about Bessie’s journey from New Orleans to Dayton. She shared her story last fall with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Cynthia Wallace-King.

Transcript:

It’s been 60 years since WYSO went on the air and we’re listening back to some highlights from our rare audio collection.

When WYSO went on the air, most of what you heard was classical music. Programs like Music of Spain, High Fidelity Concert and a nightly show called Land of the Quiet Mind, where you could hear Bach, Beethoven, Brahms and those guys.

In the 1960s came more jazz, rock, folk, bluegrass and more live performances.

Commentary: Defining Rural Character

Aug 16, 2018
Howard Sacks' farm in Gambier, Ohio.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Looking out over the rolling farm fields from the front porch of his 94 acre farm in Gambier, located in Knox county, former Kenyon College professor and former Director of the Rural Life Center, Howard Sacks reflects on what the definition of rural character is, and what it means to him.

Louis Eckert
Senior Voices

For Daytonians of a certain age, the memories of the city’s glory days as a post-World War II manufacturing center are vivid. Louis Eckert started working at Delco Products in the 1970s, while still a student at Patterson Co-Op High School in Dayton, and he attended the General Motors Institute of Technology in Flint, Michigan. He recalled his GM career in this Senior Voices interview with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Carol Jackson.

Transcript:

Natural fence rows are increasingly being cleared.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

When early settlers came to Ohio around two hundred years ago, they cleared the vast forests  - they wanted open land - to build houses,  to grow crops, and raise livestock.

As more people arrived, it became common practice to leave a narrow strip of uncultivated land between you and your neighbor. These natural fence rows were a way to designate property boundaries and help keep livestock from wandering away.

Eleanor Kohlmann
Senior Voices

The week on Senior Voices, we meet 93 year-old Eleanor Kohlmann. Born Eleanor Dell in 1926 over in Yellow Springs, her family moved to Belmont when she was just a small child. Eleanor shared her memories with Dayton Metro Library interviewer, Brandon Ulman.

Transcript:

Brandon Ulman (BU): What’s your best memory from childhood?

Diane Alexander
Senior Voices

In this Senior Voices web extra, Diane Alexander talks about expanding her family through adoption. She shared her story with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Cynthia Wallace-King.

Transcript:

Connie Cole
Senior Voices

This week on Senior Voices, we meet 84-year old Connie Cole. Born in Minnesota and raised in Washington, DC, she came to the Dayton area in the early 1960s when her husband got a job at Wright-Patt. Together, they built a house and raised their three kids in a neighborhood called Saville in Riverside, where she’s lived ever since. Connie shared her memories with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Jason Coatney-Schuler.

Transcript:

Krista and Jamie Arthur at Little Miami Farms in Spring Valley.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

When Europeans came to Ohio, one of the first crops they cultivated was hops; A small green flower that’s a main ingredients for brewing beer, which was a staple of their diet.

The Ohio Valley provided the perfect soil for the fast growing plant. But, in the early 21st century came Prohibition, plus plant diseases and harmful insects.  So Ohio farmers eventually quit growing hops. 

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