WYSO

Jess Mador

SENIOR PRODUCER, EDITOR FOR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND SPECIAL PROJECTS

After three and a half years as WYSO News Managing Editor, Jess Mador now works to help WYSO expand its community engagement and storytelling efforts. Mador is an award-winning public radio journalist, multimedia producer and documentarian. She previously created and led TruckBeat, a Knoxville-based health journalism project, producing audio and video stories, and live events for AIR's national Localore: Finding America initiative. Before that, Mador was a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul and worked as a freelance journalist, producing stories for various public radio news and digital outlets, programs and podcasts, including for National Public Radio, American Public Media, WNYC, West Virginia Public Broadcasting and 100 Days in Appalachia. Mador has also worked in New York City film and television production, and for PBS public television programs at Oregon Public Broadcasting and Thirteen. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York.  

Open Clipart User nebu

Many Miami Valley voters this election will have the chance to consider ballot measures to increase funding for streets, roads and bridges. Here's more on what to expect:

 

 

In Centerville, Issue 3 would increase the municipal income tax by half a percent for general municipal operations. These include funds for police, maintenance, streets and capital improvements.

After the state of Ohio filed a lawsuit, the owner of Pineview Estates agreed to bring four gallons of water per trailer each day the water is shut off. Residents have been purchasing their own water for years.  pineview
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Residents of a troubled Miami Township mobile home park are drinking bottled water for a second day after an electrical outage cut water service to the site.

It’s the latest in a string of problems for Pineview Estates. The park is involved in a lawsuit filed earlier this year by the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and is being managed by a court-appointed receiver for failing to comply with Ohio Environmental Protection Agency rules.

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