WYSO

Jason Reynolds

Community Voices Producer
John Everett, a Carillon Historical Park volunteer, umpires a game between the Carillon Clodbusters and the Hall of Fame 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings in early August. The Clodbusters play again this Sunday, August 25, at Carillon Historical Park.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Professional baseball is celebrating its 150th anniversary this summer, and the pro game has its roots here in Southwest Ohio. 

In 1869, The Cincinnati Red Stockings were America’s first and only pro team. They toured the country playing amateur clubs. Baseball was different then, and tougher. It was played barehanded. There were no gloves, no stadiums, no peanuts and cracker jacks.

Andy Grimm

Crowds are expected in Courthouse Square Sunday for the sixth-annual “Rally For Recovery,” an event promoting recovery from addiction. The rally is hosted by the nonprofit advocacy group FOA Families of Addicts.

FOA Executive Director Anita Kitchen says last year’s rally was attended by more than 3,000 people.

This year's event, she says, will have a broader Dayton focus.

Reach Out hosts a free medical clinic for the uninsured and underinsured at the AME Chapel in Yellow Springs every Tuesday from 4:30 to 6:30.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Yellow Springs is now home to a free medical clinic. And while the clinic is only open two hours a week, the free care is going a long way for some people in Greene County.

It’s 4:30 on a Tuesday, and the free medical clinic at the AME Chapel in Yellow Springs just opened.

Charles Browder Jr. was first in line. He came in hopes of getting medication for his high blood pressure and arthritis.

“They took me in,” Browder says. “They took my vitals and everything, got me my prescriptions that I needed.”

The Bridges family drove over an hour to place nine teddy bears on the memorial in the Oregon District, one for each of the victims who lost their lives.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

It’s been a week since a 24-year-old gunman shot and killed nine people in Dayton’s Oregon District, leaving more than two dozen other people injured.

And, the district was busy this weekend with crowds of people lining up to pay their respects at a makeshift memorial to the victims.

The sidewalk memorial of photos, flower bouquets, cards and candles outside the nightclub where the shooting happened grows bigger every day. Hanging above it is a graffiti mural reading “Dayton Strong” in red and blue bubble letters and hearts.

Oregon District residents and regulars gather at Lily's Bistro, just hours after the mass shooting, to raise money for a waitress who was shot and in emergency surgery. Outside, fire and police are still cleaning the streets.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Just hours after the mass shooting that killed nine and injured dozens more, Emily Mendenhall decided to throw a fundraiser. Not some time off in the future. But right then and there.

Mendenhall is from a restaurant family that owns multiple businesses on 5th Street, where the shooting occurred. She runs Lily’s Bistro. Her brother runs Blind Bob’s, and one of the waitresses who works at Blind Bob’s, Alayna Young, was shot.

sign in front of Omega Music listing victims of the 2019 mass shooting
April Laissle / WYSO

The jumble of shoes abandoned by people fleeing for their lives early Sunday morning has been removed from the parking lot of Ned Pepper’s bar. Near the front door, flowers and candles are piling up. Heart-shaped wreaths honoring the victims stand a few feet away.

The Dayton community is in mourning after 9 people were killed and over 30 injured in Sunday’s mass shooting.

Fifth street is typically empty on Mondays because most businesses are closed. But today,  reporters from all over the country pace on the sidewalks. TV news trucks hum on both sides of the street.

The Riverside Mayor and Chamber of Commerce officials came out for a ribbon-cutting at Mad River Remedies, the first medical marijuana dispensary to open in the Miami Valley.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The Miami Valley’s first medical marijuana dispensary held its grand opening Thursday. Mad River Remedies in Riverside offers 20 types of medical marijuana to registered patients with one of 21 state-approved medical conditions.

Riverside Mayor Bill Flaute was on hand for the ribbon cutting. He dismissed concerns about people abusing medial marijuana.

“It’s not about abuse,” Flaute says. “It’s about using it correctly and making people feel better when they’re in a lot of pain.”

Sinclair Dean of Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Anthony Ponder says the federal grant will help prepare students for high paying and relatively recession-proof employment in the manufacturing sector. 
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

With help from a federal Department of Labor grant announced Wednesday, Clark State Community College, Sinclair Community College and the Dayton Region Manufacturers Association will work together to train 365 skilled workers over the next four years, and match them with Miami Valley manufacturing employers.

Harrison Township is storing tornado debris in a vacant lot off of Forest Park Drive.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Tornado cleanup continues in Harrison Township, where three twisters touched down on Memorial Day, leaving wreckage from one end of the township to the other.

More than 400 homes and apartments were destroyed in the outbreak, and township officials say they’re still working to connect displaced residents with relief services.

In a lot on Forest Park Drive, there’s a gigantic pile of storm debris roughly two stories high and about the length of a football field.

Matt Dierking organizes the Skinner Pipe Organ concerts at the Dayton Art Institute and often performs at them. A Skinner in full working order with the original pipes is a rarity these days, something akin to a Stradivarius instrument.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

One of the most interesting works at the Dayton Art Institute is a musical instrument: a pipe organ that was constructed in the Rose Auditorium 90 years ago.

It was built by Ernest M. Skinner, one of the most renowned organ makers of the early Twentieth Century.

The restoration process took years, and DAI has been celebrating by offering free concerts on select Thursday afternoons.

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