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Lower Incomes Tied To Lower Life Expectancies In Montgomery County

Race- and Ethnicity-Adjusted Life Expectancy by Commuting Zone and Income Quartile, 2001-2014  Estimates of race- and ethnicity-adjusted expected age at death for 40-year-olds computed by commuting zone. The 595 commuting zones with populations above 25 0
Journal of the American Medical Association
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Race- and Ethnicity-Adjusted Life Expectancy by Commuting Zone and Income Quartile, 2001-2014 Estimates of race- and ethnicity-adjusted expected age at death for 40-year-olds computed by commuting zone. The 595 commuting zones with populations above 25 0";

This week, the American Medical Association published an extensive report affirming the relationship between poverty and life expectancy.

 

According to the report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, higher incomes are associated with greater longevity—that’s not necessarily new information, but they say there’s a gap of about 14 years life expectancy between the richest 1% and the poorest 1% of individuals.

 

In a list of the 100 largest counties in the U.S., Montgomery County ranked near the bottom—coming in at #93 for residents at poverty level or below with lower life expectancies..

 

Dr. Sara Paton, the epidemiologist at Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County (PHDMC) says, “Specifically for Dayton, we know that those areas of low income, they’re dealing with a lot of social determinants of health issues that the rest of the community doesn’t have to deal with. Things like housing, transportation, safety, access to food.”

 

Paton says Dayton and Montgomery County were hit especially hard by the 2008 economic downturn creating new poverty for the area.

 

But, Public Health says there are a number of programs in place that continue to combat the issues adversely affecting poorer neighborhoods—like WIC and other outreach programs for mothers and infants, and programs to help with health insurance and in-home nursing care.

 

 

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.