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2 Dayton leaders want more money for housing, youth programs, fire

Fairchild Sloss
Kathryn Mobley
/
WYSO
Dayton City Commissioners Darryl Fairchild and Shenise Turner-Sloss explain why they can not approve the current proposed 2023 city budget.

Commissioners Darryl Fairchild and Shenise Turner-Sloss say the 2023 proposed city budget does not provide funding for services and programs that would benefit all citizens.

As a result, they’re inviting Commissioners Chris Shaw, Matt Joseph and Mayor Jeffery Mims to keep revising it before finally approving it.

Friday afternoon during a press conference in City Hall Chambers, they laid out their concerns to the media and to community supporters. Both say there is a discrepancy around funds to demolish blighted and vacant structures.

“Originally, $15.8 million dollars was earmarked to bring down almost 900 vacant structures,” Fairchild said. “But the 2023 proposed budget only allots $12.4 million dollars to demolish nearly 700 structures. A difference of almost $3.5 million dollars–what’s happening to this money? And why are fewer buildings coming down?” Fairchild asked.

He also wants more funding for Mayor Jeffery Mims youth programs.

“We’ve not been investing in our kids for too long,” Fairchild said. “We need to fund youth development programs where they build connections and have positive, constructive relationships with adults, where they’re challenged, they’re given purpose and meaning. We know all of those things work to get our young people on the right path.”

Meanwhile, Commissioner Turner-Sloss says more dollars are needed to create affordable housing and to re-open Fire Station 10 on South Broadway.

“The proposed budget continues the erosion of emergency services in our community and that is the service of our fire department," she said. "The quality and quantity of affordable housing in Dayton. Dayton housing market, we’re in a crisis.”

Saturday afternoon on December 10, all of the commissioners and Mayor Jeffery Mims will meet to reconsider the budget.

Kathryn Mobley is an award-winning broadcast journalist, crafting stories for more than 30 years. She’s reported and produced for TV, NPR affiliate and for the web. Mobley also contributes to several area community groups. She sings tenor with World House Choir (Yellow Springs), she’s a board member of the Beavercreek Community Theatre and volunteers with two community television operations, DATV (Dayton) and MVCC (Centerville).