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WYSO Daily News Update: October 18, 2022

Sugar maple tree in fall colors in Ohio
James St. John
/
Wikimedia Commons

Your WYSO Daily News Update for October 18, 2022, with Mike Frazier:

  • Ryan vs. Vance smackdown debate
    (Statehouse News Bureau) - The candidates in Ohio’s close and expensive US Senate race met on stage for a final debate Monday, sparring over immigration, guns, abortion and other issues. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports.
  • Free election day bus rides
    (WYSO) - Greene CATS public transit is giving free rides to the polls on election day. All flex routes in Beavercreek, Dayton, Fairborn, Xenia and Yellow Springs will ride for free on Tuesday, November 8, 2022. All of those routes will make stops at polling locations. Riders can also schedule rides specifically to their polling location.
  • Independent State Legislature Theory on Ohio mapmaking
    (Statehouse News Bureau) - Republican legislative leaders say the Ohio Supreme Court does not have the ability to limit lawmakers’ power in regulating congressional elections. The GOP leaders have filed the appeal in the U.S. Supreme Court in order to enact their congressional district map, which was twice ruled unconstitutionally gerrymandered. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.
  • Day of the Dead in Dayton
    (WYSO) - The Dayton Metro Library will host a Day of the Dead parade this Saturday. It’s part of the library's National Hispanic Heritage Month programming. Alejandro Figueroa has that story.
  • First floor fund
    (WYSO) - The City of Dayton has created a new program to assist start-ups and existing businesses, especially ones that have historically not had access to traditional funding sources. The First Floor Fund will have $7 million to lend out to companies to promote economic growth. Garrett Reese reports.
A chance meeting with a volunteer in a college computer lab in 1987 brought Mike to WYSO. He started filling in for various music shows, and performed various production, news, and on-air activities during the late 1980s and 90s, spinning vinyl and cutting tape before the digital evolution.