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Unpacking bipartisan efforts to reform the Electoral Count Act

Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) preside over a joint session of Congress on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images)
Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) preside over a joint session of Congress on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images)

A bipartisan bill to reform the Electoral Count Act of 1887 is underway.

But is it enough to prevent another Jan. 6th?

Democracy scholar Matthew Seligman says Congress has a narrow window of time to pass the legislation.

“It’s a loaded gun and it can be something like a sniper shot at the heart of American presidential democracy,” Seligman says. “And so, I think it is absolutely critical that Congress pass this legislation.”

Today, On Point: A look at what’s inside the proposed Electoral Count Reform Act.

Guests

Matthew Seligman, fellow at the Center for Private Law at Yale Law School. (@Matt_Seligman)

Derek Muller, professor of law at the University of Iowa College of Law. (@derektmuller)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. (@JackBeattyNPR)

Also Featured

Sen. Chris Murphy, Democratic U.S. senator from Connecticut. (@ChrisMurphyCT)

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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