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What would a 'no-fly zone' mean for Ukraine?

Ukrainian soldiers help a fleeing family crossing the Irpin river in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, March 5, 2022. (Emilio Morenatti/AP)
Ukrainian soldiers help a fleeing family crossing the Irpin river in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, March 5, 2022. (Emilio Morenatti/AP)

No-fly zones. Big rhetoric around three simple words.

From Iraq in 1991 to Libya in 2011.

But what does it take to establish a no-fly zone?

Today, On Point: Ukrainians pleading to close their skies.

“Please stop the bombings, how many more cruise missiles have to fall on our cities until you make this happen?” Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy said.

Is escalation inevitable? Or can NATO find another way to assist Ukraine?

Guests

John Kornblum, former U.S. diplomat with a focus on Russia and Europe, dating back to the Nixon administration. Signatory of the Open Letter Calling for Limited No-Fly Zone in Ukraine.

Lt. Gen. David Deptula, retired U.S. Air Force officer, commander of the U.S.-led no-fly zone over northern Iraq. Dean of the Mitchell Institute of Aerospace Power Studies. (@Deptula_David)

Also Featured

Doug Feith, former assistant secretary of defense for policy for president George W. Bush.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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