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From ship to shore: What's behind the supply chain breakdown at the Port of Long Beach

Containers are stacked at the Port of Long Beach in Long Beach in Calif., Friday, Oct. 1, 2021. U.S. manufacturing growth slowed in October amid growing headaches from supply chain bottlenecks. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Containers are stacked at the Port of Long Beach in Long Beach in Calif., Friday, Oct. 1, 2021. U.S. manufacturing growth slowed in October amid growing headaches from supply chain bottlenecks. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Just how long is the wait to get containerships into the Port of Long Beach?

President Biden recently announced one move: a deal to keep the port open 24/7.

“This is a big first step in speeding up the movement of materials and goods through our supply chain,” the president said.

But is it the right move?

“From our perspective, we don’t need 24-7 truck gates,” Matt Schrap, CEO of the Harbor Trucking Association, said. “What we need is more thoughtful approach to how those trucks operate when they’re open.”

Today, On Point: From ship, to crane, to container, to shore, what’s really happening at the Port of Long Beach?

Guests

Matt Schrap, CEO of the Harbor Trucking Association, a coalition of intermodal carriers serving America’s West Coast Ports. (@mattschrap)

Mario Cordero, executive director of the Port of Long Beach. (@MarioCorderoLB)

Also Featured

Ramon Ponce de Leon, president of ILWU 13, which represents longshore workers. (@ramonpdl_ILWU13)

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.