© 2021 WYSO
Our Community. Our Nation. Our World.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

The Longest War: What The Future Holds For Afghanistan's Free Press

Afghan presenter Zarmina Mohammadi for TOLOnews takes part in a live broadcast at in Kabul in 2018. (WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP via Getty Images)
Afghan presenter Zarmina Mohammadi for TOLOnews takes part in a live broadcast at in Kabul in 2018. (WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP via Getty Images)

This is Part IV in our series The Longest War.


Over the last 20 years, journalists and entrepreneurs like Saad Mohseni have built a free and independent press in Afghanistan.

Mohseni recently told the Journo podcast that the Taliban can’t shut that all down.

“We have to be able to continue whether we’re in Afghanistan or outside Afghanistan. We owe it to the Afghan nation, to our viewers to continue, with both news and our entertainment programs,” Mohseni said. “I don’t want to overstate this, but I think media has become the beacon of hope for the country.”

Today, On Point: Our series The Longest War concludes with a look at what the future holds for Afghanistan’s free press and, ultimately, its citizens.


Find a partial transcript of reflections from this episode here.


Guests

Saad Mohseni, chairman and chief executive of the MOBY Group, an independent media company in Afghanistan. (@saadmohseni)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. (@JackBeattyNPR)

Also Featured

Aisha Barakzai, she spent her childhood in Afghanistan and came to the U.S. at age 14.

Dr. Iman Ahmad-Sediqe, sociologist who conducted the first in-depth ethnographic study of the Afghan American diaspora. She lives in Washington, D.C. (@imanistan)

Sana Safi, Afghan broadcast journalist who works for the BBC World Service. (@BBCSanaSafi)


From The Reading List

Washington Post: “Opinion: My Afghan news channel won’t stop its important work. We hope the world doesn’t look away.” — “The streets of Kabul have been swept by fear and panic since the Taliban arrived and took control of the government this week.”

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.