Our Community. Our Nation. Our World.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

How To Embrace The Uncertainty Of A Pandemic

Visitors line up as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York reopens to the public on August 29, 2020.(KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)
Visitors line up as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York reopens to the public on August 29, 2020.(KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)

To our listeners: On Point has decided to suspend the ‘comments’ section of our website while we explore new ways to engage our audience. On Point listeners are responding more these days via social media, particularly Twitter and Facebook, and effectively moderating On Point’s comments section pulls resources away from our core mission — journalism. We’ve concluded there are better ways to achieve the same kind of community discussion around issues raised in our broadcasts. So please join the conversation on social media (@onpointradio). Or, email us at onpoint@wbur.org.  


We talk with entrepreneur and author Margaret Heffernan about how we can best survive — and even embrace — the chaos of a pandemic.

Guest

Margaret Heffernan, business leader, author and entrepreneur. Professor of practice at the University of Bath. Author of “ Uncharted.” ( @M_Heffernan)

From The Reading List

Excerpt from “Uncharted” by Margaret Heffernan

Excerpt from “Uncharted” by Margaret Heffernan. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced without permission in writing from the publisher.

Financial Times: “ Uncharted: How to Map the Future Together — a plea for fresh thinking” — “‘The sagacious businessman is constantly forecasting,’ said the great economist Irving Fisher, a man thoroughly convinced of the power of data to make the future legible.”

Medium: “ Predicting the next epidemic” — “Something remarkable happened in UK media on Tuesday morning, around 650 am. Kate Jones, Professor of Ecology and Biodiversity at University College, London was talking about the wet markets of China and whether they should be banned, in order to reduce the risk of pandemics.”

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.