WYSO

WYSO Weekend

  

A union representing Dayton school bus drivers has declared intent to strike after months of failed contract negotiations with the district. The announcement comes less than a year after the district narrowly avoided a teacher strike.

Despite growing awareness about the dangers of concussion, sports-related brain injury is common among student athletes. And, the diagnosis of concussion often depends on a symptom-screening test that’s subjective. In today’s installment of our Scratch innovation series, we hear about a new Dayton-based mobile app designed to make concussion screenings more objective. WYSOs Jess Mador reports its creators hope the app could keep more injured players off the field -- safe from repeated concussions and potentially fatal brain damage.

 

 

WYSO's newest series, County Lines, focuses on small towns and rural communities in the Miami Valley and beyond. Community Voices producer Renee Wilde travels down the highways and back roads to bring our listeners stories of country life that go beyond the stereotypes. In the first story from this series, we hear that across the U.S., a growing number of rural communities are facing a growing veterinarian shortage, that is expected to worsen in coming years.

This week, Montgomery County Judge Anthony Capizzi led a national panel discussion in Washington D.C. before Congressional leaders and legislative aides. The focus of the Congressional briefing was to raise awareness about the struggles many communities face as a result of the opioid epidemic. Capizzi serves as president of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

When President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency, it came with a regulation change meant to ease provider shortage. It allows doctors to prescribe addiction medicine virtually, without ever seeing the patient in person. In Indiana, this has been legal since early 2017 but, as Side Effects Public Media’s Emily Forman reports, it’s complicated.

Entrepreneur Magazine reports that revenue from food trucks has nearly tripled, from $960 million to $2.7 billion, nationally over the last five years. And here in the Miami Valley, food trucks have become commonplace. Jayne Monat of Yellow Springs asked WYSO about the impact of Dayton area food trucks on the local economy in comparison with brick and mortar restaurants For this installment of WYSO Curious, we sent Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds out to eat.

Across the country, many school districts are grappling with declining enrollment. Many of these districts are opting to shutter schools in an effort to save money and consolidate resources. This is despite conflicting research on the benefits of school closures. Now, Dayton may be next.  In December, DPS leaders revealed many district schools are operating at under 50-percent capacity. Officials launched a task force to help decide the fate of Dayton’s emptiest school buildings –– many of them on the West Side.

Wright State University faculty members say they are willing to go on strike if a fair contract can’t be negotiated.  Several hundred professors and supportive students gathered for a rally on campus before marching to a scheduled community forum, where Wright State president Cheryl Schrader and university trustees addressed budget concerns.

 

Montgomery County has some of the highest rates of infant mortality in the country. The problem affects African Americans -- at all income and education levels --most often. WYSOs Jess Mador introduces us to a Dayton public-health campaign to address that. Then Mador's report continues with a look at how state health officials are promoting visiting nurses to help reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate, which is much higher than the national rate, despite progress in preventing sleep-related infant deaths.

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we have the first of two stories about teenagers dealing with the Opioid Crisis. Today we'll hear from Megan Johnson, a senior at Centerville High School. *Support for Dayton Youth Radio comes from the Virginia W. Kettering Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.

 

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