WYSO

Wright State University

Harrison Hall at Miami University.
Public Domain File:Muohioharrison.jpg

Some Miami Valley college officials say they’re working to support international students affected by the Trump administration travel ban, advising them to evaluate their study plans before the fall semester begins.

The Supreme Court recently upheld by a 5-4 vote the ban for residents from seven countries, most with Muslim majorities.  

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

A top former official at Wright State University has officially been fired after previously being on paid leave for more than three years. The provost’s termination is related to an ongoing probe into alleged violations of a federal temporary work-visa program.

Officials placed former provost Sundaram Narayanan on paid leave in 2015 after a federal investigation was launched into alleged immigration-law violations. 

A pallet of Pampers at the Dayton Mixing Center.
Marci Rhodes / Procter & Gamble

Ohio is located within one day’s drive of more than half the country’s population. This fact is often touted by development officials looking to boost the state’s economic profile.

It’s also a favorite talking point among many Miami Valley business leaders, who say the proximity to interstate highways gives Dayton an edge in attracting new investment.

If a pilot program at Wright State University was expanded to all of Ohio’s public colleges and universities, it could save students some $300 million a year.

That’s according to the head of Wright State’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency, professor Dan Krane.

Krane helped implement the university’s latest cost saving program, called Inclusive Access, which was piloted by 1,000 students taking nine courses at the Dayton campus this year.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University’s Board of Trustees officially approved the school’s 2019 budget at a meeting Friday. The plan includes another round of layoffs. It's the latest chapter in the school's months-long effort to avoid being placed on state fiscal watch.

Wright State President Cheryl Schrader says as many as 40 positions could be eliminated during the coming fiscal year beginning July 1. She says some of those cuts could come through attrition.

Schrader speaks at a 2017 welcome reception shortly after being named Wright State's president.
April Laissle / WYSO

Wright State University President Cheryl Schrader today announced the school is set to add millions of dollars to its cash reserves this year. But that may not be enough to keep the school off the state’s fiscal watch list.

In an email to campus this morning, Schrader said the school is projected to add $7.2M to its reserve fund this fiscal year. That’s $1.2M more than Wright State officials said would be needed to avoid state watch earlier this year.

Columbia City Blog

The Ohio primary is a week away. The race in the 10th congressional district is crowded, with candidates from both sides of the aisle vying for the seat.

The district currently represented by Republican Mike Turner covers Montgomery, Greene and parts of Fayette County.

WYSO’s April Laissle caught up with Dr. Lee Hannah, an associate professor of Political Science at Wright State University, to hear how the contest is shaping up.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Last week, Wright State officials announced they must cut another $10 million from the school’s budget before June 30 to avoid being placed on state fiscal watch.

It’s the latest development in Wright State’s years-long financial crisis, which was prompted in part by widespread overspending. WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with education reporter April Laissle about how further budget cuts could impact ongoing faculty contract talks.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University is taking steps to cut $10 million from its current fiscal year budget ending June 30. University officials say the move is part of an effort to avoid state fiscal watch by adding money to Wright State's reserve fund, which was depleted by overspending.

Many WSU faculty members, already reeling from millions of dollars in budget cuts that took effect last year, say they’re not sure what’s left to cut.

Wright State University's ArtsGala is a springtime tradition.  Now in it's nineteenth year, the event showcases the work of Wright State students in a variety of visual and performing arts including music, dance, theatre, and motion pictures. Assistant Dean in the College of Liberal Arts Jennie Buckwalter and several students participating in this year's event joined WYSO Music Director Niki Dakota live in studio on Excursions for a preview.

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