WYSO

Water

Workers prepare for the next batch of beer at Land Grant Brewing in Columbus.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A growing industry in Ohio is calling on local, state, and federal officials to take a serious look at water quality issues. Craft brewery owners say their business completely hinges on safe drinking water. 

Several craft beer companies gathered at Land Grant Brewing in Columbus to urge government leaders for help in protecting the waterways.

As Colin Vent with Seventh Son Brewing explains, most microbrews need about five to seven gallons of water in order to produce one gallon of beer.

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is calling for more study into chemicals found in Dayton’s water supply. They’ve also been found in groundwater near more than 126 United States military installations, including Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The chemicals are the focus of a newly released government report showing they’re more dangerous than previously thought.

Tap water
Joe Cheng / Flickr Creative Commons

New tests show low levels of a common toxin have leaked into Dayton’s drinking water supply. City officials believe the toxin is coming from Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

Tests done by the city found very low levels of chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS in the drinking water supply. The contaminants had previously been found in raw groundwater.

Huffman Dam
Tim Inconnu / Flickr Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has acknowledged that a chemical contaminant found near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base was also used at a city-owned firefighter training center. The news comes to light as the city has, for months, been increasing pressure on Wright-Patt to stop the flow of contaminated groundwater from the Base into the Huffman Damn.  

 

  The man-made chemicals, per and polyfluoroalkyl substances known as PFAS, are used in industrial and consumer products, and as a fire fighting agent.

 

Are We Heading for a Hydropower Boom on the Three Rivers?

Dec 12, 2016
The hydroelectric power station at the Kinzua Dam on the Allegheny River (pictured above) is one of the larger hydropower projects in Pennsylvania—generating enough electricity to power 400,000 homes.
Michael Scialdone / Flickr Creative Commons

Behind a chain link fence, Paul Jacob watches water spill over a dam on Neville Island—a 1,200-acre stretch of land in the Ohio River near Pittsburgh that’s a hive of industrial lots and chemical plants. But to Jacob, the white froth at the base of the Emsworth Back Channel dam—built in 1936—represents an opportunity.

“The water over that dam—that basically is unused energy,” Jacob says. “You’ve got a substantial flow of water.”

Tap water
Joe Cheng / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Fairborn is recovering from a water line break that left 2,500 people without reliable service. The cracked section of the line, located on Duncan Street, was replaced on Monday. The city issued a boil order for residents in several areas of the city on the same day, causing many local businesses to close.
 

The order was lifted yesterday, after water samples came back negative for any bacteria.

The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

Much of the city of Fairborn is without water today due to a major water line break.

The City issued a boil order to residents and businesses along Faircreek Ridge, National Road, Colonel Glen Highway, Presidential Drive, and Zink Drive. Water pressure issues began on Sunday night, with some losing water service completely.

A few businesses were forced to close as a result.

400 people in 7 residence halls on Wright State University’s campus are also affected. The buildings are not fully occupied due to summer break.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Pineview Estates mobile home park was recently without water yet again, despite help from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

 

The water system at the park has been unreliable for years, and landlord Timothy Dearwester still hadn’t made an effort to fix it, despite being asked to by the Ohio EPA and a Montgomery County Court judge. The Attorney General’s office is seeking to put Dearwester in jail for failing to comply.

How a Burning River Helped Create the Clean Water Act

Apr 22, 2016
Cleveland State University Library

NOTE: This story was originally published on April 17, 2015.

At the time of the first Earth Day in 1970, the Cuyahoga River had long been a pollution problem. Cleveland had been a major industrial city since the 1880s, and the mayor then called the river “an open sewer through the center of the city.”

But when the Cuyahoga River caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, many believe it became the symbol of out-of-control pollution that was needed to get the Clean Water Act passed.

The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

A school district in central Ohio has shut off its drinking fountains after finding high lead levels in the water.

The Granville school district northeast of Columbus says tests show water coming from some of the drinking fountains are above the federal limit.

School leaders say the problem is with the drinking fountains and not the water coming into the buildings.

The district says it shut off access to the drinking fountains Wednesday and is running more tests.

Bottled water is being given to students and teachers.

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