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LGBTQ

When Ronson Rowley was a teen, he said he used to sneak into a nightclub called the Ten Bar. “It was the only black gay club here in Indianapolis,” he recalled. One night he ran into his uncle.

“He looked me dead in the face,” he recalled. “And [he] said what are you doing here? I said, the same thing you’re doing here.”


Dayton Filmmaker Leah Byrd Brings 'Hot & Bothered' To The Web, Big Screen

Feb 8, 2018
Leah Byrd wrote, directed, and stars in Hot & Bothered
George Drake Jr. / WYSO

Dayton filmmaker Leah Byrd is trying to break down racial and gender boundaries in a new web series called Hot & Bothered. The characters in her series are among the most underrepresented in television: black women and members of the LGBTQ community.

A 2016 report by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation found that less than 40% of all regularly recurring characters on TV shows are black, and that only 25% of LGBTQ characters are people of color. Leah Byrd’s series Hot & Bothered has both.    

Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Both of Ohio’s U.S. senators expressed surprise at President Trump’s announcement today that he will bar transgender people from serving in the military. 

Trump made his surprise declaration in a series of Twitter posts, saying the military can’t afford what he claimed are the “tremendous medical costs and disruption” that comes with transgender people.

Democrat Sherrod Brown called that ungrounded.

Dayton's annual Pride events kick off Friday with Affair On The Square, a downtown food truck rally. To learn more about what to expect over the next week, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney sat down with R.J. McKay, chair of the Greater Dayton LGBT Center and one of the organizers of Pride. McKay gives us the rundown of this year's festivities, and says Pride celebrations in Dayton have had a long and evolving history.

Dayton LGBT Film Festival

The 11th annual Dayton LGBT Fim Festival takes place at the NEON Movies in downtown Dayton this weekend, Oct 7th - Oct 9th. Feature films, documentaries, and short films highlight this 3-day event.

WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with NEON Manager, Jonathan McNeal to get the details.

Rep. Nickie Antonio (D-Lakewood) has been pushing for stronger anti-discrimination laws for years
Karen Kasler

While people are still reeling in the aftermath of the mass shooting in Orlando, leaders in Ohio say it’s time to add more protections for the LGBT community. 

When responding to the brutal attack at a gay nightclub in Florida that left 49 people dead and dozens of others wounded, President Barack Obama not only declared it as an act of terror but an act of hate.

Todd Figgins

Gay pride celebrations in Dayton were held just over a week ago, but on Sunday afternoon, local LGBT organizations were back on Courthouse Square in a show of solidarity and support for victims, families, and residents of Orlando after this weekend's mass shooting.

Representatives from the city were also on hand. Kery Gray is the executive assistant in the City Commissioners' office.

Lake Miller says his work in justice and equality issues largely comes from how he was raised, and the work his mother has done in her life.
Lake Miller

In this WYSO Weekend excerpt, meet Lake Miller from Yellow Springs, Ohio. He'll soon be heading to college and says he'll specialize in either entrepreneurship or business management at Wittenberg University.

Lake will likely do well with either decision—even now the 18-year-old Eagle Scout is the youngest member of the national Scouts for Equality Leadership Council and he's just begun the first LGBT-friendly Boy Scout unit at Temple Israel in Dayton.

This weekend, Dayton will host its 40th annual pride celebration with events running Friday, June 3, through Sunday, June 5.  WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Allison Cox, a board member with the Greater Dayton LGBT Center at MJs on Jefferson about this year's festivities and how Dayton Pride has changed in the last 40 years. 

Cox says the event has grown in its 40 year history.

Dayton is banning its employees from non-essential government travel to Mississippi and North Carolina, saying recent laws passed in the two states discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

A Thursday memo from Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley forbids city dollars paying for non-essential travel to the states.

The Dayton Daily News reports Whaley said the new laws conflict with the city's values and anti-discrimination ordinances enacted by city commissioners.

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