WYSO

law enforcement

The 2014 shooting of John Crawford sparked protests across the Miami Valley. In this photo, a group calling itself the Groovy Grannies organized a demonstration against police violence in Springfield.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

New testimony from an expert witness appears to implicate the police officers involved in the shooting death of John Crawford III at a Walmart store in 2014. The statement emerged as part of the Crawford family’s ongoing civil suit against the Beavercreek police department and the Walmart company. But, the family’s attorney says the development is unlikely to trigger a new criminal investigation into Crawford’s shooting.

Nick Evans / WOSU

The city of Westerville is reeling after two police officers were shot and killed responding to a 9-1-1 call over the weekend. On Monday, Gov. John Kasich ordered flags across the state to be flown at half-staff until the officers are interred.

Officers Anthony Morelli and Eric Joering died after they were ambushed responding to a call early Saturday afternoon.

Struggling to hold back tears, Westerville Police Chief Joe Morbitzer describes the incident.

Members of the advisory board will need to create a use-of-force database for officers statewide.
ohio.gov

An advisory panel on police and community relations has developed drafts of standards on use of deadly force and on law enforcement recruitment and hiring. The drafts say police would be permitted to use deadly force only when officers are defending themselves or other people from serious injury or death.

 

A Hamilton County grand jury has indicted a University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing for murder in the shooting death of Samuel DuBose in a July 19 traffic stop.

The shooting was, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joseph T. Deters said, the most “asinine” and “senseless” act he has ever seen a police officer commit.

“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years,’’ Deters said in a press conference early Wednesday afternoon at his office. “It was the purposeful killing of a person. That’s what makes it murder.”

450 members of the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office are in the process of completing diversity training for the first time in over 10 years.

While a recent incident involving officers sending racist texts was a catalyst for the program, Sheriff Phil Plummer called the training long overdue.

“You know we need to respect each other before we go out, and respect the public," he said.

Plummer cites low minority numbers on the force as one reason for the need for diversity training.

An Ohio lawmaker is working on a bill that would require law enforcement officers throughout the state to wear body cameras. The legislation is coming soon.

Democratic State Rep. Kevin Boyce says 30 other states are considering requiring police officers to wear body cameras and he wants Ohio to be number 31.

“The whole idea is that to better protect our law enforcement officers who work to protect us every day and also to continually find ways to strengthen the integrity of the process where police officers interact with the public,” Boyce said.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich’s task force studying police and community relations has released its recommendations. The report calls for things like greater oversight of police departments, a focus on hiring minority officers and spending more on training. Kasich has issued an executive order help carry them out.

Kasich created an advisory board to come up with new standards for police departments statewide on issues like deadly force and hiring practices. The board was also charged with helping communities throughout the state better understand the role of law enforcement.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s Advisory Group on Law Enforcement Training is recommending some changes it says will improve policing statewide. This group wants some standards to determine who should get into training classes and increases training for officers statewide.

DeWine says there are few requirements for people who want to enroll in police officer training academics throughout the state.

The law enforcement training panel created by Attorney General Mike DeWine met for a final time Monday before it will issue a report later this month. 

The advisory group is expected to make recommendations on training standards for law enforcement, especially in community relations and in situations involving the use of force. Chair Reggie Wilkinson, who once headed the state’s prison system, says to make sure its report doesn’t just sit around – as task force reports often do – the group wants to consider recommendations that can be implemented without lawmaker approval.