WYSO

Health

Campers gather for a group photo one last time at Camp Sunrise, Ohio’s only summer camp for kids affected by HIV and AIDS.
Jocelyn Robinson / WYSO

For many Ohio children living with HIV and AIDS, a special annual summer camp has meant a chance to escape, a time to get away, have fun and connect with other HIV-positive kids. 

Camp Sunrise north of Columbus has been around since the mid-1990s. But, with advances in treatment over the last two decades, more people with the virus are living longer, healthier lives. And this summer the camp welcomed its last group of campers before closing its doors for good.

Jenny Holmstrom

It’s a quiet summer evening outside the Xenia home of Michael and Lisa Anderson. But inside, it’s a world of women and small children. This is Lisa Anderson’s world. As a certified doula for the last two years, she provides support services for women and their newborns at home or in the hospital delivery room.

On the carpeted floor in the Andersons' living room, three infants play with brightly colored toys. Their tiny hands and fingers push and slap at the noise-making buttons, dials and knobs. Perhaps the quietest member of the group is Buffy, the Anderson’s Cairn terrier.

Shortly after noon on July 19, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Crews are already in the process of removing medical equipment from Good Samaritan Hospital. The West Dayton facility shut its doors last week amid outcry and the opening of a federal civil rights investigation.

Now, Good Samaritan owner Premier Health is moving forward with plans to dismantle and demolish the complex over the next two years.  

Able Law Attorney, Ellis Jacobs stands with The Clergy Community Coalition to announce the Department of Health and Human Services - Civil Right Division will investigate the announced closure of Good Samaritan Hospital on Dayton's west side.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Attorneys representing the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition group announced Monday the United States Department of Health and Human Services has opened an investigation into the planned closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. Attorney Ellis Jacobs with Able Law says the agency has also asked to meet with Premier Health Partnership officials within the next five days.

Members of the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition, from left: Robert Jones, David K. Greer, Rev. Rockney Carter, Bishop Richard Cox and Richard Clay Dixon.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A coalition of West Dayton religious leaders and activists says it's considering a lawsuit to block Premier Health from closing Good Samaritan Hospital. The decades-old hospital is slated to close its doors for good July 23. The emergency department will close at noon July 19.

Premier officials maintain the hospital’s operation is no longer financially sustainable. The health system is moving forward with plans to shutter and demolish the medical center.

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is calling for more study into chemicals found in Dayton’s water supply. They’ve also been found in groundwater near more than 126 United States military installations, including Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The chemicals are the focus of a newly released government report showing they’re more dangerous than previously thought.

Major Wendy Stiver with Dayton Police
Jerry Kenney

Montgomery County has some of the highest rates of infant mortality in the country, and data show the problem is often related to premature birth and low birth weight.

Now, the Dayton Police Department is trying something new as part of a larger countywide effort aimed at bringing infant mortality rates down. Police will be collaborating with an intensive home-visiting program that helps families with newborns and young children.  

Heartfulness Meditation at Amanda’s Balance yoga studio in Piqua. Forty new seekers participating in the six weeks Heartful Living Class.
Heartfulness Dayton

In today’s world of social media overload, the 24-hour news cycle, and high tension politics, it can be difficult for individuals to maintain a ‘sense of self’ or to hear their own inner-voices among the noise - to remain self-aware in the face of today’s intersectional culture.

 

Uma Mullapudi is regional administrator for Heartfulness, an international network of wellness and meditation centers operating in 150 countries. She says it's important to find silence in the noisy world of today.

 

warrantedarrest / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio has licensed 56 locations that can sell medical marijuana once it becomes legal this fall.

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy on Monday awarded those provisional dispensary licenses that give the stores six months to meet state operation requirements. A total of 376 applications were received.

The executive director of the National Cannabis Industry Association of Ohio, Thomas Rosenberger, says the board has ended months of speculation about where patients will be able to get medical marijuana.

If Gem City's fundraising effort is successful, construction will begin early next year. The store is set to open in the summer of 2019.
April Laissle / WYSO

Organizers have secured a location for Gem City Market, a planned co-operative grocery store designed to help alleviate food insecurity in West Dayton.

Officials announced this morning Gem City Market will be built in one of Ohio’s largest food deserts, on the 300 and 400 blocks of Salem Avenue in Northwest Dayton. The site currently houses a vacant lot and shuttered art supply shop.

Organizers are hoping to raise a total of $4.2 million to fund the project. More than one-third of that amount has already been committed.

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