WYSO

Commentary

The Taylorsville Dam in Vandalia is one of five dams in the Miami Conservancy District.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Since the recent hurricanes in the gulf region and the Caribbean, University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha has turned his attention to how the Miami Valley might cope with severe flooding  and takes a look at research done by one of his University of Dayton colleagues for clues.

Extreme weather events were in the news quite a bit this summer, from brutal heat waves in southern Europe, to forest fires in the northwestern US, and maybe most noticeably, the incredible rainfalls brought about by Hurricane Harvey in Houston and the Gulf Coast region.

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Washington-Centerville Library's annual exhibit is honoring our nation's military veterans. It is now  through Sunday. The exhibit includes special items on loan from the Dayton VA Medical Center complex. Visitors and school children are also encouraged to write thank you cards to our military which will be delivered to our troops before the Christmas holidays.

Martin LaBar / Flickr Creative Commons

When I am sitting on the porch, I hear two Osage fruits fall into the great open palms of the Lenten roses near the west fence. At the pond, my koi lie low on the bottom, subdued by the autumn. Pale grape leaves streak the honeysuckle hedge. Even though the hummingbird food slowly disappears, it seems that the yellow jackets are the only ones drinking. One white bindweed has blossomed near the trellis, and Ruby’s white phlox have a few new flowers. All the finches at the feeders have lost their gold and are ready for winter. 

Downtown Dayton Partnership

Scarves. Hats. Jackets. Porters and stouts. Yes, fall has arrived in downtown Dayton, and First Friday is the perfect time to enjoy all the sights and sounds. Art galleries, boutique retailers, performance halls, bars, restaurants, and many more locations will host special activities tonight. 

CarrieLu / Flickr Creative Commons

Standing at the end of October, I hold fast to remnants of the year and to the emotions that stick to them, feelings that reflect the things I see, spun from the tilting of the Earth toward solstice.

From the alley: the last two apples still hanging from the apple tree, the wilting of the final purple fall crocus, the blackening of the tall goldenrod, a handful of milkweed plants, pods splayed, silky seeds shining in the low sun.

Bat Boy: The Musical was inspired by a series of tabloid headlines claiming that a terrifying creature, half-man and half-bat, had been discovered in a cave, escaped, and was being pursued by government officials. This deals with serious themes such as hypocrisy, acceptance, forgiveness, but often punctures the most serious moments with slapstick, surrealism, camp-horror, and irony. It is tonight and Saturday at the Schuster.

Erik Drost

Early in the afternoon of the recent solar eclipse, I was cutting back zinnias in my garden.

Sparrows  chirped off and on and cicadas buzzed and cardinals and crows called once in a while.

A friend had called the day before. And he said he had heard that birds stopped singing in the middle of a solar eclipse as though they thought night had arrived.

There is a play now through Sunday at the Schuster Center, Mathile Theatre. It is titled TAPE and is about a guy on the verge of hitting it big who hooks up for the weekend with his best friend from high school who makes his money selling dope. Beneath its suspenseful, high-stakes surface, TAPE examines questions of motive, memory, truth and perception.

Antti Lipponen / Flickr Creative Commons

Hurricane season lasts for a few more weeks. The US has been fortunate over the past few years because there haven’t been many direct hits on the mainland, but this year the hurricanes just keep coming. Sustainability commentator Bob Brecha takes a look at what we should expect for the future with warming oceans.

Nicholas Erwin / Flickr Creative Commons

I left for New York in the fog and mist, and then an hour later, I drove into low, dark stratus clouds, and the wind came in strong from the northeast against me. The colors of middle autumn that would have been so rich and bright against the blue sky seemed dull and ominous to me. I looked for murmurations of starlings spinning together over the brown fields, but there seemed to be no life at all in the landscape. Traffic was loud and heavy all the way across Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

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