WYSO

Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Lori Yuppa's young son Chase Cummings died from a drug overdose
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This installment introduces us to two Loris: Lori Erion and Lori Yuppa.

The women share more than just a name. Both have had children touched by opioid addiction.

The experience led Erion to create the Dayton nonprofit Families of Addiction or FOA, to advocate, "that we are not alone," says Erion.

Sarah Clay, a 31-year-old recovering heroin addict, with three of her four children
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we meet Urbana 31-year-old Sarah Clay.

In 2007, Sarah met her husband Justin. 

“We worked together at a factory. We hit it off pretty quickly. We moved in and I was pregnant within four months,” Sarah says.

Their family grew to include four children. But everything soon changed when the couple fell deep into opioid addiction.  

Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor William Roberts, who works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades clean.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid epidemic. In this story, we meet Trotwood-native Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor William Roberts.

Roberts works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades clean. As Lewis explains in this story, he first met Roberts at a treatment program for struggling addicts. 

What follows is a transcript of their conversation, edited for length and clarity.

88th Air Base Wing ‎Air Force Research Laboratory 88th Air Base Life Cycle Management Research Laboratory Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Air and Space Intelligence Center 445th Airlift Wing   Air Force Institute of Te
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is launching a formal Incident Review Board to evaluate this month’s false alarm active-shooter incident

Unsubstantiated reports of a shooter at the Wright-Patt medical center Aug. 2 triggered a lockdown of base facilities and an emergency response from multiple city, state and federal law enforcement agencies.

www.heroinaddiction.com

Montgomery County health officials say the number of drug overdoses is rising.

Montgomery is among seven counties across Ohio that are seeing a spike in recent drug-related emergency room visits and overdoses this summer.

The county reports that between July 26 and July 30, there has been an increase in the number of drug overdose encounters in Butler, Hamilton, Lake, Lorain, Lucas, Montgomery and Stark counties, with a total of 63 drug-related emergency room visits, 39 accidental overdoses and 24 other drug-related visits.  

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base was on lock down due to a reported active shooter situation. Base officials confirmed Thursday afternoon that the reports were false.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Officials at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are investigating what led to Thursday’s false report of an active shooter situation on the base. The incident caused an hours-long lockdown and prompted an emergency response from multiple government and law enforcement agencies, including a SWAT team.

Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base officials say there was no “real world” active shooter incident at the base Thursday afternoon. False reports of a shooter at the base's hospital situation triggered an hours long base-wide lockdown. 

Shortly after noon on July 19, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Crews are already in the process of removing medical equipment from Good Samaritan Hospital. The West Dayton facility shut its doors last week amid outcry and the opening of a federal civil rights investigation.

Now, Good Samaritan owner Premier Health is moving forward with plans to dismantle and demolish the complex over the next two years.  

Members of the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition, from left: Robert Jones, David K. Greer, Rev. Rockney Carter, Bishop Richard Cox and Richard Clay Dixon.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A coalition of West Dayton religious leaders and activists says it's considering a lawsuit to block Premier Health from closing Good Samaritan Hospital. The decades-old hospital is slated to close its doors for good July 23. The emergency department will close at noon July 19.

Premier officials maintain the hospital’s operation is no longer financially sustainable. The health system is moving forward with plans to shutter and demolish the medical center.

Immigration protest draws large crowd in Dayton
Robert Pieper / WYSO

Around 1200 people rallied Saturday in downtown Dayton against the Trump administration's controversial separation and detention of immigrant families at the United States-Mexico border.

The protest, organized by a coalition of activisit groups including Dayton Indivisable For All (DIFA) and Organizing for Action (OFA), was one of more than 700 “Families Belong Together” immigration rallies held nationwide on Saturday, and the second immigration protest to be held in Dayton in June.

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