WYSO

April Laissle

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

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Ohio Statehouse
User: thoth188 / Creative Commons

A bill to strengthen and standardize training for school resource officers is on its way to the Senate. The legislation includes funding for schools so they can pay for officers to get that training. 

As a House committee discussed the need to improve school resource officer training, the Chardon High School shooting came up frequently.

The fatal attack in 2012 by 17-year-old T.J. Lane left three students dead.

Frank Hall, a former teacher and coach at Chardon, has been hailed as a hero for chasing Lane out of the building during the shooting.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University is taking steps to cut $10 million from its current fiscal year budget ending June 30. University officials say the move is part of an effort to avoid state fiscal watch by adding money to Wright State's reserve fund, which was depleted by overspending.

Many WSU faculty members, already reeling from millions of dollars in budget cuts that took effect last year, say they’re not sure what’s left to cut.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton school bus drivers have approved a contract deal with Dayton Public Schools, preventing a strike that was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Details of that deal have not yet been released. But, according to a statement from the district, members of the Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE voted overwhelmingly in favor of the new contract. The school board is set to officially approve the deal at a scheduled board meeting Tuesday.

The two parties announced they had reached an impasse late last month, after more than nine months of negotiations.

school transportation bus buses DPS public schools transit children kids education
Ohio Department of Transportation Facebook page

Dayton Public Schools and the union representing district bus drivers have reached a tentative agreement to avoid a strike, according to a statement from both parties.

The deal still needs to be approved by the school board and the union's full membership before it is finalized.

The two parties have been in negotiations for over 9 months. In that time, they’ve reached tentative agreements that were eventually voted down by members of the bus drivers union. Bus Drivers are scheduled to strike on Tuesday, April 10 if a final contract deal is not ratified.

Renee Wilde / WYSO

The National Weather Service (NWS) has confirmed a tornado with winds reaching 90 miles per hour touched down Tuesday in eastern Beavercreek Township and western Xenia Township along Ludlow Road. Another touched down in Grove City in Franklin County. NWS officials say they will continue to survey storm damage in Clark and Greene counties over the next few days.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

With less than a week to go before a planned bus driver strike, Dayton Public School officials have yet to release details of a backup student-transportation plan.

The Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE bus drivers’ union announced plans to strike last week, after contract talks with the district broke down. DPS officials say there are no plans to continue negotiations with the union before the April 10 strike date.

To learn more about how the impending driver strike could impact DPS parents and students, WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with WYSO education reporter April Laissle.

yellow school buses
Larry Darling / Flickr Creative Commons

A union representing Dayton school bus drivers has declared intent to strike after months of failed contract negotiations with the district. The announcement comes less than a year after the district narrowly avoided a teacher strike.

If a deal is not reached, more than 150 drivers plan to strike on April 10. That’s a day after students are set to return to school after Spring Break. It would also coincide with state required testing, according to a district press release.

Dayton VA Medical Center

The Dayton VA Medical Center is launching a new effort to reach out to veterans who may qualify for health benefits.

The organization is hosting its first ever Benefits Enrollment Fair Thursday, March 29. The event is aimed at helping veterans and their families navigate the often complex sign-up system.

Ted Froats, a spokesperson for the Dayton VA Medical Center and a veteran of the Iraq War, says like many veterans, he wasn’t sure if he qualified for medical benefits when returned to civilian life.

Some health advocates want to legalize a controversial practice they say would make routine dentistry more accessible and affordable for the most underserved Ohioans.
April Laissle / WYSO

More than half of Ohio counties don’t have enough dentists for the population. Numbers show the dental shortages are especially severe in many rural and low-income communities.

Ann Naber, a member of the Ohio Dental Hygienist Association (ODHA) and an instructor at Sinclair Community College, says this lack of access can lead to severe -- and often expensive -- health consequences for many people.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

An Ohio village ordered to pay back $3 million in citations stemming from automated traffic cameras is taking its case to the state Supreme Court.

 The Hamilton-Middletown Journal News reports New Miami has asked the Ohio Supreme Court to hear its appeal. Lower courts have ruled that New Miami isn't immune to legal action because it gained funds by collecting fines under a traffic camera program that was declared unconstitutional in 2014.

The village argues sovereign immunity is guaranteed to municipalities across the state and necessary for preserving "fiscal integrity."

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